Organized Labor

The SETC is proud to partner with organized labor and recognizes the efforts of unions to create good jobs and opportunities to advance in careers for workers.  Integral to the success of sector-based workforce development in New Jersey, unions contribute knowledge and expertise about labor markets and industry skill needs, a structure for successfully providing registered apprenticeships, and experience in collaborating with diverse partners.

NJ PLACE

One notable effort is the New Jersey Pathways Leading Apprentices to a College Education (NJ PLACE) initiative.  NJ PLACE is a nationally recognized best-practice program that is the result of strong partnerships between organized labor, the State Employment and Training Commission, the New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, higher education, and other key partners.  Through NJ PLACE, individuals can earn college credit for registered apprenticeship programs to give them a head start toward earning a degree at any of New Jersey's community colleges. To learn more about NJ PLACE, visit NJPLACE.org or e-mail NJPLACE@dol.nj.gov.

 

Sisters in the Brotherhood (SIB) Program

A progressive program intended to diversify and strengthen the labor movement, Sisters in the Brotherhood’s (SIB) mission is to build a network that creates a recruitment and retention plan for women apprentices to have careers as union carpenters.  The United Brotherhood of Carpenters (UBC) selected the Northeast Regional Council of Carpenters (NRCC) to pilot this initiative which focuses on creating and maintaining a 10% enrollment of women apprentices in New Jersey.  A program that offers community engagement, pre-apprenticeship training, mentoring, and a network to provide you with the tools to be confident and successful in a highly competitive industry that provides equal pay for equal work.  Jobs don’t have gender!  For additional information visit:  www.northeastcarpenters.org/sisters

 

The SETC is committed to continuing such efforts and identifying new ways to expand their relationships with organized labor.